Jorge Moll: Understanding the Science of Giving

Jorge Moll, a Brazilian neuroscientist, along with his colleague, Jordan Grafman, decided to experiment on the human brain. They invited several volunteers and asked them to imagine a scenario where they would be giving a tremendous amount of money to the charity they wanted and another situation where they would be keeping the money for themselves. The two neuroscientists who are working on the research were surprised to see the results of their study. It shows that when people are imaging things related to charity and generosity, a small area of the brain becomes activated, sending pleasurable signals that are comparable to eating or having sex. During the experiment, they found out that giving and charity is innate to the human brain, and that people would feel something good because of the signals sent by the brain. Learn more about Jorge Moll at Google Scholar.

The study conducted in 2006 supports what other religions are stating, that giving is much better than receiving. Jorge Moll and other neuroscientists around the world are performing the studies concerning on morality and its correlation with science. They wanted to know why doing something right is better, and they tried to prove it with scientific facts. In the span of the research about morality, Jorge Moll and his colleagues found out that the human brain evolved while keeping its moral compass intact. It is the reason why doing something good feels much better.


Despite the advancement in medicine and technology, neuroscientists are still baffled about how the human brain works, and what will happen if is used to its full capacity. The mystery of morality is just one of the many mysteries surrounding science, and neuroscientists are slowly unlocking its secrets. Jorge Moll and his colleagues would continue doing experiments involving morality, and they wanted to find out more information about the trait naturally to all human beings. However, there are already groups who are protesting the experiment done by the neuroscientists. These people fear that by allowing scientists to conclude about what’s going on inside the brain, the idea of free will would merely be forgotten, and the moral basis of doing what is right or wrong would only depend on brain chemistry. Know more about Jorge at Crunchbase.

1 thought on “Jorge Moll: Understanding the Science of Giving”

  1. Looking for means to make giving count is one thing that most companies and large donors want to take care of. However the need for will last for some time because it is the presence that help people. Being willing is another thing that define one leader from the others too because it is in the power of others to give too but not simple.

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