Michael Lacey and Jim Larkin’s Continuous Fight for Latino Rights

Phoenix native, Jim Larkin dropped out of Arizona State University in 1972 when he teamed up with Michael Lacey, the son of a construction worker, to occupy the Phoenix New Times, a nestling campus weekly newsletter that had developed as an answer to the conservative local media’s coverage of student anti-war protests. Learn more about James Larkin and Michael Lacey: https://michael-lacey.com/ and http://www.laceyandlarkinfronterafund.org/about-lacey-larkin-frontera-fund/michael-lacey/

With Lacey as the executive editor, and Larkin conducting the advertising position, the free editorial grew its audience while delving into political and social problems and rising eminence among the nation’s agenda of different newspapers.

In 2007, Lacey and Larkin were both arrested when agents from Maricopa County Selective Enforcement Unit knocked on their doors. Both were jailed on October 18, 2007, for confessing in Phoenix Times that grand jury summons targeted the paper’s writers, editors, and its readers.

The arrest was initiated and attained by Joe Arpaio, the sheriff of Maricopa County, Arizona. All the charges were dropped within a day following a public outcry. A continuing investigation exposed that the warrants were fraudulent.

All of this was set up by Arpaio because he was disgusted by the way New Time’s would exposure his department’s inhuman misdeeds, since his election to office in 1992.

The sheriff’s grudge opposing the two journalists and his neglection for the integrity of the Hispanics who lived and worked in his authority gave progress to a federal civil-rights lawsuit, Melendres v. Arpaio. This rise led to Arpaio’s ruins. Read more: Michael Lacey | Crunchbase and Lacey and Larkin Frontera Fund

Arpaio was issued a preliminary injunction by U.S. court judge, G. Murray Snow. The judge ordered the sheriff to stop using Latino drivers as his objective. Even though the judge’s orders were obvious, Arpaio and his office teammates continued doing the same for the next 18 months.

Arpaio and his team admitted to violating the rules and says they persisted because they misunderstood the terms given. He was convicted of criminal contempt by Susan Bolton, the federal district judge.

Arpaio’s office didn’t just immorally target the Hispanic and Latino community; they also fought against those who criticized them. The case of Phoenix New Times is an excellent example of this.

The arrest of Lacey and Larkin for something published by them was an infraction of the First Amendment. This created titles at news channels all over the world. Maricopa’s county attorney gathered a press conference to declare that he had closed the case.

In late 2013, this episode in Lacey and Larkin’s career ended when Maricopa County paid a $3.75 million agreement to conclude correctly that their arrests were wrongful. Both Lacey and Larkin used the money to develop a non-profit organization named the Frontera Fund, which labors to stand by the freedom of immigrants and migrants.

A lot of time passed until finally Arpaio entirely suffered the consequences of his actions. In November of 2016, voters avoided electing him for another period as sheriff. In August 2017, President Trump, excused the past sheriff, saving him from a probable prison term.

Although Arpaio won’t spend the time, he deserves behind bars, the favorable things that are done by Frontera Fund should help to unravel some of the damage caused by him and encourage other people not to become someone like Arpaio.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *